Using udev rules with OL / RH7 on VMware Fusion

Preparing to use udev rules on VMware Fusion

Before you can use udev rules with your new VMware Hard Drives you need to update the Virtual Machines .vmx file and set the following.

disk.EnableUUID = “TRUE”

Without this setting the ‘/usr/lib/udev/scsci_id’ command will no values.

As with all configuration files it’s best practice to create a backup before editing, however this is especially true for the VMware Fusion .vmx file as any mistake can result in a Virtual Machine which will no longer boot.

Shutdown your Virtual Machine before you attempt any edits of the .vmx file.

Creating the udev rules

Once your edit is complete you can reboot your VM and confirm is working ok with ‘usr/lib/udev/scsci_id -g -u -d /dev/’ e.g.

[root@ol72 ~]# /usr/lib/udev/scsi_id –verbose -g -u -d /dev/sdc

36000c298d0c4d6c7ace0c7b990069f48

[root@ol72 ~]# /usr/lib/udev/scsi_id –verbose -g -u -d /dev/sdd

36000c290045c8d9e8660057e191ec523

[root@ol72 ~]# /usr/lib/udev/scsi_id –verbose -g -u -d /dev/sde

36000c29b6dc77c32663c5b8354fffd37

[root@ol72 ~]# /usr/lib/udev/scsi_id -g -u -d /dev/sde

36000c29b6dc77c32663c5b8354fffd37

Now you know the Disks unique ID’s you can add them to a new udev rule. e.g.

/etc/udev/rules.d/99-oracle-asmdevices.rules

KERNEL==”sd?1″, SUBSYSTEM==”block”, PROGRAM==”/usr/lib/udev/scsi_id -g -u -d /dev/$parent”, RESULT==”36000c298d0c4d6c7ace0c7b990069f48″, SYMLINK+=”dg_prod_oradata1″, OWNER=”grid”, GROUP=”asmadmin”, MODE=”0660″

KERNEL==”sd?1″, SUBSYSTEM==”block”, PROGRAM==”/usr/lib/udev/scsi_id -g -u -d /dev/$parent”, RESULT==”36000c290045c8d9e8660057e191ec523″, SYMLINK+=”dg_prod_oraredo1″, OWNER=”grid”, GROUP=”asmadmin”, MODE=”0660″

KERNEL==”sd?1″, SUBSYSTEM==”block”, PROGRAM==”/usr/lib/udev/scsi_id -g -u -d /dev/$parent”, RESULT==”36000c29b6dc77c32663c5b8354fffd37″, SYMLINK+=”dg_prod_orafra1″, OWNER=”grid”, GROUP=”asmadmin”, MODE=”0660″

Unlike RedHat 5 & 6 there is no need to restart the udev service on RedHat 7

Testing the udev rules

You can now test the udev rules using udevadm test e.g.

udevadm test /block/sdb/sdb1

And check the results with ls -l /dev/

[root@ol72 dev]# ls -l /dev/sd*

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 32 Oct 18 11:29 sdc

brw-rw—- 1 grid asmadmin 8, 33 Oct 18 11:49 sdc1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 48 Oct 18 11:29 sdd

brw-rw—- 1 grid asmadmin 8, 49 Oct 18 11:55 sdd1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 64 Oct 18 11:29 sde

brw-rw—- 1 grid asmadmin 8, 65 Oct 18 11:55 sde1

[root@ol72 dev]# ls -l /dev/dg*

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 4 Oct 18 11:49 /dev/dg_prod_oradata1 -> sdc1

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 4 Oct 18 11:55 /dev/dg_prod_orafra1 -> sde1

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 4 Oct 18 11:55 /dev/dg_prod_oraredo1 -> sdd1

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